DIY Popcorn: Give Ancient Superfood A Kick

 , Zester Daily  |  Updated: January 14, 2016 15:36 IST

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DIY Popcorn: Give Ancient Superfood A Kick
Some of the oldest surviving ears of popcorn were discovered in "Bat Cave," New Mexico, around 1950 and are believed to be 5,600 years old. Most of the world's popcorn is grown in the United States, with half of it produced in Nebraska and Indiana. Credit: Copyright 2015 Susan Lutz
 

Popcorn is an ancient superfood -- a simple and nutritious form of a 9,000-year-old staple. Popcorn is DIY food preservation at its most basic and most delicious.



Popcorn is simply preserved corn, a way of saving the harvest. Fresh corn can, of course, be boiled, roasted, steamed or baked. But corn became a staple in the Western Hemisphere because it could be dried and stored all winter.



Corn was first domesticated in Mexico from a wild grass nearly 9,000 years ago. Archeologists have discovered corncobs from the northern coast of Peru that could date to 6,700 years ago, and scientists believe that this dried corn was eaten as popcorn and ground into corn flour.



Benjamin Franklin remarked on the magical properties of corn that would "pop." Franklin marveled at the mysterious recipe of "parching corn," which he wrote about in 1790. He described how the Native Americans "fill a large pot or kettle nearly full of hot ashes, and pouring in a quantity of corn, stir it up with the ashes, which presently parches and burst the grain."



This "bursting" was shocking to Franklin, since it "threw out a substance twice its bigness." Franklin boasted that popcorn -- when ground to a fine powder and mixed with water -- created a veritable superfood, claiming that "six ounces should sustain a man a day."

"Superfood" may seem like a bit of hype for a snack most often eaten while watching bad movies. But in 2012, researchers at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania reported that popcorn has more antioxidant polyphenols than any other fruit or vegetable.



One serving provides more than 70% of a person's daily serving of whole grain, and a single 4-cup portion provides 5 grams of fiber. Popcorn is no longer a guilty pleasure, it's a virtuous reward.



The "bursting" that gives popcorn its name is the result of physics inherent in that tiny white or golden nubbin. Inside a popcorn kernel's outer hull lies the endosperm, which is made of soft starch and a bit of water. Although all types of corn will "pop" to some extent, popcorn will actually explode and turn inside out when heated.



To pop successfully, a kernel of dried popcorn should ideally have a moisture level of 13.5% to 14%. When the kernel is heated to an internal temperature somewhere between 400 to 460 F, the water in the endosperm expands, building up pressure that eventually causes the hull to burst. Steam is released and the soft starch inside the kernel puffs up around the shattered hull.




A popcorn worth the obsession



The type of popcorn that comes out of the microwave is often a poor substitute for heritage breeds or locally sourced popcorn. My children and I are currently obsessed with purple popcorn, which we buy dried on the cob at our farmers market or as "Amish Country Purple Popcorn" from the Troyer Cheese Company.



I prefer to roast it in a skillet with canola oil and coarse sea salt -- simple and basic. My kids' prefer their popcorn covered in a spice mixture we created, containing cocoa powder, sugar, and cinnamon (though this may counteract some of the health benefits).



For adults I add an additional "kick" with cayenne pepper. Try this with a few types of popcorn -- each in its own bowl for the sake of comparison -- and you'll have more than a movie snack, you'll have a healthy, crowd-pleasing conversation starter that won't last long.




Cinnamon-Cocoa Popcorn With a Kick
 

Enjoy Cinnamon-Cocoa Popcorn (with or without the kick) while it's still warm. Cooled popcorn can be stored in an airtight container for several days, but it will lose a bit of its crunch. Credit: Copyright 2015 Susan Lutz




Cook time: 15 minutes, no prep time required.



Total time: 15 minutes



Yield: 3 to 4 servings



Ingredients



1/4 teaspoon cocoa powder



1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon



2 teaspoons granulated sugar



1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt



1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper (optional)



3 tablespoons canola oil



1/3 cup popcorn kernels



Directions



1. Heat a 2- to 3-quart heavy-bottomed saucepan over high heat for 1 to 2 minutes.



2. While pan heats, place cocoa powder, cinnamon, sugar, sea salt and cayenne pepper (if desired) in a small bowl. Stir to combine.



3. Back at the stove, turn heat down to medium high and add oil to heated pan. Carefully place two or three popcorn kernels in oil and cover pan with lid.



4. After test kernels pop, add enough popcorn to cover the bottom of the pan in a single layer -- about 1/3 cup.



5. When kernels start to pop, lower heat to medium and shake pan gently until popping stops. (I like to rotate the pan in a circular motion over the burner to keep the popcorn moving.)



Comments

6. Pour popped corn into a large bowl. Sprinkle popcorn with topping mixture, toss to coat evenly, and eat immediately. Coated popcorn can be stored in an airtight container for several days, but it will lose a bit of its crunch.

© Thomson Reuters 2016


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