Garlic & Broccoli May Speed up Cancer Recovery

   |  Updated: November 26, 2014 18:45 IST

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Garlic & Broccoli May Speed up Cancer Recovery
Research suggests that there are some foods with anti-cancer properties which contain certain nutrients that help block tumours and prevent progression of cancer. Previous studies have shown that foods like walnuts, tea, mushrooms and others may lower risk of cancer. A lot has been talked about broccoli and its anti-cancer properties. A new study conducted University of Copenhagen in Denmark adds to the existing evidence. It also highlights the positive effects of garlic in speeding up cancer recovery. (Why Broccoli is Good for You)

The study was published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and it states that selenium which is naturally found in garlic and broccoli slows down immune over-response and  improves treatment against melanoma and prostate cancer. 

Melanoma, prostate cancer and certain types of leukaemia weaken the body by over-activating the natural immune system. The immune system is designed to remove substances that are not normally found in the body. However, different cancer cells contain mechanisms that block the immune system's ability to recognise them - allowing the cancer to grow. Stimulating molecules of certain cancer cells over-activate the immune system and cause it to collapse.

According to Professor Soren Skov from Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, "We have now shown that certain selenium compounds which are naturally found in garlic and broccoli effectively block the special immuno-stimulatory molecule that plays a serious role for aggressive cancers such as melanoma, prostate cancer and certain types of leukaemia. If we can find ways to slow down the over-stimulation, we are on the right track. (More on Broccoli's Anti-Cancer Properties)

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In the long run, these results may help in development of better cancer drugs with fewer adverse effects and improve cancer treatment.

With inputs from IANS

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